Marriage: The Mystery of Faithful Love

Marriage: The Mystery of Faithful Love

Author: Dietrich Von Hildebrand
Publisher: Sophia Institute Press
Format: Paperback
Pages: 84
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These pages will give you what you need to make your marriage a source of profound happiness and lasting peace:

  • Knowledge: You'll come to understand the nature of marriage and its superiority to living together and other temporary unions.
  • Love: You'll learn to distinguish love from lust, infatuation, and other common counterfeits; and you'll discover the healing role it can play in the best and bleakest of marriages.
  • Faith: You'll come to see how the sacramental marriage of Christians is the fulfillment and perfection of marriage, giving husband and wife what every spouse secretly longs for.

    Especially today, this beautiful book which reveals the sublime vocation of Christian marriage is a must for anyone who is eager to live worthily this great mystery of love.

    Marriage will show you:

  • The one right motive for marrying and the many wrong ones (some often accepted by Christians)
  • The difference between the meaning of marriage and its purpose (and the dangers of confusing the two)
  • The five ways in which married love differs from other loves
  • Six counterfeit loves: what sometimes passes for love isn't
  • The key role of will in sustaining love
  • Your unhappy marriage: it may be a clear call from God
  • How difficulties and suffering can deepen your marriage and make you and your spouse better persons
  • How marriage reveals God's love and presence
  • How Christianity intensifies married love
  • The meaning of marriage as a sacrament: its promises, its demands, and how it is a source of strength and grace.
  • ISBN:
    Publication Date: 1991
    Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.9 x 0.4 inches

    About the Author:
    Dietrich Von Hildebrand

    Dietrich von Hildebrand (1889-1977), born in Florence, was the son of renowned German sculptor Adolf von Hildebrand. A leading student of the philosophers Edmund Husserl and Max Scheler, he took up the "great questions" - about truth, freedom, conscience, community, love, beauty - with a freshness that allowed him to break new ground, especially in ethics, but also in epistemology, social philosophy, and aesthetics. His conversion to Catholicism in 1914 was the decisive turning point of his life and the impetus for important religious works. His opposition to Hitler and Nazism was so outspoken that he was forced to flee Germany in 1933, and later across Europe, finally settling in New York City in 1940, where he taught at Fordham University until 1960. He was the author of dozens of books, both in German and English. He was a major forerunner of Vatican II through his seminal writings on marriage, on Christian philosophy, and on the evil of anti-Semitism.