Utopia Nowhere

Utopia Nowhere

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Publisher: Tumblar House
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Format: Paperback
Pages: 188
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History is the record of an apocalyptic struggle between those two primordial kingdoms - that of God and that of the devil. St. Augustine saw these irreconcilable factions as the City of God and the City of Man. Both are world governments in the largest possible sense, and they are locked in mortal combat till the end of time, for nothing less than the souls of men. When "separation of Church and state" was established as a political principle in modern times, the two Cities began parting company visibly before the eyes of all, but only to square off properly and get at each other better. Like any couple whom God has joined together, Church and state can never be divorced. No matter how many fictitious decrees are handed down by the court of domestic relations, they are still married. And that precisely, is what causes all the trouble.   This book covers a range of topics including Joan of Arc, Louis XVI, the political dimension of the sacred heart dimension, and of course Americanism. All focus on Utopia, that mysterious social aberration which always threatens, but never comes to fruition, because the very word means Nowhere.

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TO BEGIN WITH ...

Adam was a great disappointment to the devil. His wife had been easily deceived by his wiles, and when Adam followed her into disobedience against his better judgment, the angelic father of lies must have felt certain that all material creation was within his grasp. With Adam in his power, everything over which Adam had been given dominion would naturally fall under his exquisite satanic control, to rearrange and govern as he saw fit.

As Perfecter and Re-creator of the Universe, Satan would build on earth the Utopia he had failed to establish on high. His savage thirst for empire would be slaked, for naturally he expected that Adam, with the shamefaced Eve at his side, would become his terrestrial ally in the Great Revolution he had started in heaven. But this never happened.

Unlike Eve, Adam “was not deceived” (1 Tim. 2:14). First he hid, then he blamed his wife, but in the end our good father repented. Because even in his fallen state he was still head of the human family, he earned a second chance not only for himself, but for all of us. To the devil’s horror, instead of persisting in their disobedience, our first parents humbly accepted the punishments God meted out to them.

Let this be a lesson to us, for they ended by setting a good example. Determined to remain subject to God’s rule as best they could, they incurred, of course, the Adversary’s undying enmity. This brought on the state of affairs now generally known as “the human condition,” and under the circumstances, we are very fortunate to be in it.

But the devil remained steadfast in his desire to supplant the divine economy with his own artificial government, and he has been able to whip up plenty of enthusiasm for his program among Adam’s descendants. Beginning with Adam’s firstborn Cain, many would be led to “make the world a better place” by concocting utopias to inflict on themselves and others.

As the ages rolled on, humanity inevitably polarized around those two contingents designated in Genesis as “the seed of the woman” and “the seed of the serpent.” One wanted no more nonsense, because obviously the situation was bad enough, and the other was sure it could solve everything if only God were kept out of it. St. Augustine saw these irreconcilable factions as the City of God and the City of Man. Both are world governments in the largest possible sense, and they are locked in mortal combat till the end of time, for nothing less than the souls of men.

When “separation of Church and state” was established as a political principle in modern times, the two Cities began parting company visibly before the eyes of all, but only to square off properly and get at each other better. Like any couple whom God has joined together, Church and state can never be divorced. No matter how many fictitious decrees are handed down by the court of domestic relations, they are still married. And that precisely, is what causes all the trouble.

The text which follows deals with this touchy subject. Some minor redundancies may be found in it, for it is adapted from articles which appeared in the United States in The Remnant, in Scotland in Apropos, in England in Christian Order, and in France in Action Familiale et Scolaire. Three chapters, “The Usan Catholic” and those dealing with Joan of Arc and devotion to the Sacred Heart of our Lord, were originally delivered as talks at the annual Christ the King Symposium sponsored by the Christian Law Institute in El Paso, Texas. All focus on Utopia, that mysterious social aberration which always threatens, but never comes to fruition, because the very word means Nowhere.

 

Solange Hertz

Big Rock, Leesburg, Virginia

Feast of the Purification

February 2,1993

Solange Hertz:
Solange Hertz

An established writer before the Second Vatican Council, Solange Hertz wrote for most Catholic periodicals and had five books to her credit, one a selection of the Catholic Literary Foundation. When she refused to adjust her theology to the new “Spirit of Vatican II,” her manuscripts almost overnight became unacceptable to her former editors. After a series of articles on feminine spirituality for the old Triumph magazine, she continued speaking for tradition by successfully producing The Thought of Their Heart and Sin Revisited on her own.

Customer Reviews

Based on 7 reviews
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B
B.
Solange Hertz: Always a Crowd Pleaser

You can't go wrong with this or any Solange Hertz book. Her collection of essays are both eye-opening and entertaining!

B
B.G.

A scathing indictment of Americanism, even better than Hertz’s work dedicated to that subject. Starts with Cain trying to create paradise on earth and goes to the present day, not neglecting the conspiracy of the Freemasons and our “elder brethren.” A must read!

D
D.A.
"it is not good for man to be alone!" (Gen. 2:18)

Ah yes Utopia...Nowhere to be found and as Solange Hertz puts it in her book, Utopia Nowhere, it is a pipe dream that ultimately does the will of the Devil and is contrary to God's will. Throughout the book, the main theme is universality, wherein man "succeeds" in doing what only God can accomplish: creating utopia. Mrs. Hertz goes through topics such as monarchy, democracy, globalism, ecumenism, St. Joan of Arc, revolution, and the Sacred Heart of Jesus to name a few. Within the these topics a clear, concise argument is made with corroboration from Scripture, theologians, and enemies of the Faith; all used to help disspell the perversion of the Utopian society through the will of man versus the divine plan commanded by God. Mrs. Hertz does an excellent job of creating complex scenarios that captivates the curious need for knowledge. While this is a bit more one-sided in terms of Mrs. Hertz own personal views, it nonetheless helps any reader discern our fascination with Utopia.

Personally, I do have issues with the book. Nothing major to cause me to dissuade people from reading it, it is good for the mind. In terms of personal opinion, however, Solange and I butt heads. This book alone affirms that France should be the first among the European powers, and to this degree, Mrs. Hertz's love for France becomes clear and is unrelenting. Granted France has achieved greatness and is in no way lacking, but personally I believe Spain is greater and superior in a lot of areas. These and a few others were minor personal disagreements that goaded a reaction, but, regardless I do recommend this book highly.

E
E.
The Ultimate Conspiracy

Solange Hertz's Utopia Nowhere is a mental accelerant like few other books. She takes on the greatest conspiracy of all time, the battle between God and Satan from Genesis to Apocalypse and every period of human history in between, the mystical City of God against the devil's revolutionary charade of an earthly paradise, otherwise known as "utopia." Hertz surveys topics ranging from the French Revolution, the insidious heresy of "Americanism," the US Supreme Court, and the politics of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Overall she presents riveting account of the perpetual, underlying conflict between the dreamers and schemers of utopia and the martyrs who tell them otherwise.

This is a book of real history, not average history, and by "real" I mean history viewed from Eternity, from the perspective of Divine Revelation and Divine Providence. Solange Hertz is as uncompromising and incisive in her analysis of the present world order and its origins, but in a way few authors dare approach. As an unflinching traditionalist and monarchist, Hertz presents the problems and the solutions in manner that is not “main-stream,” even by some traditional Catholic standards. You will not find any political correctness in this book: the State needs the Church, the Church needs the State, and we all need a Catholic king on the French throne.

If you are not used to a traditional Catholic view of history, politics, prophecy and devotion, Utopia Nowhere will definitely challenge you, maybe anger you, certainly make you uncomfortable and ask for more at the same time.

P
P.M.
Clever, and initially what caught my eye about the book.

This book did a very good job of tracing the seditious acts of satan as we now perceive them in our political clown world back to the early Church. It also made me sad to see how well this was understood in pre-conciliar times but we now seem to ignore all of this and accept defeat. Overall the book was clear and concise and definitely strengthened my Monarchist sympathies.

L
L.W.
Utopia nowhere

Good book. I highly recommend it.

V
V.
Invigorating, Poignant, and Provocative

As with all of her books, in Utopia Nowhere Hertz approaches history with a unique point of view:

"History is the record of an apocalyptic struggle between those two primordial kingdoms - that of God and that of the devil."

In other words, all of the important events in history can be attributed to either to God's Kingdom or Satan's, whether it be the overthrowing of a government, the emergence of democracy, the Protestant Reformation, the discovery of the New World, or any other significant event you can think of. Seeing history through this kind of lens is a fascinating journey.

The main point of Utopia Nowhere is that the revolutions in France and the North America were not so much revolutions against a king, but Christ the King. She argues that these revolutions mimic Satan's nonserviam ("I will not serve") directed toward God. In addition to that, the "equality" preached in these usurping democracies is eerily similar to the serpent's sales pitch in Eden, suggesting that if they take a bite of the apple they would be "like gods." As Huey Long, the Louisiana governor in 1935 stated, "Every man a king."

Utopia Nowhere's chapters are markedly more cohesive than most of her other books, all of which are composed by gathering various articles that she's written in the past for other publications. In addition to that, it's surprisingly more upbeat than her other books, which makes it an invigorating read. The book will continually overwhelm you with poignant, head-turning quotes that you will want to underline and remember, to the point where you may find yourself reading the book twice over to soak it up.

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