An Exorcist: More Stories

An Exorcist: More Stories

Author: Fr. Gabriele Amorth
Publisher: Ignatius Press
Format: Paperback
Pages: 203
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Following up his international best-selling book, An Exorcist Tells His Story, Fr. Gabriele Amorth, the renowned chief exorcist of Rome, expands on some of the key topics of his previous book, covering important details about demonic or occult issues. He uses concrete examples from his own experiences and those of other exorcists to illustrate and substantiate his points.

Since satanic sects, occultism, seances, fortune-tellers and astrologers are so widespread today, Father Amorth asks the question why is it so difficult today to find an exorcist, or a priest who is an expert in this field? The example and the teaching of Christ is very clear, as is the tradition of the Church. But today's Catholics are often misinformed.

Exorcisms are reserved for appointed priests, while all believers can make prayers of liberation. What is the difference? What norms must be followed? What problems are still open and unresolved in this field?

The new book by Father Amorth answers these and many other questions, supporting his discourse with a rich exposition of recent facts. A valuable, practical and instructive manual for priests and lay people, on how to help many who are suffering.

ISBN:
Publication Date: 2002-02-01
Dimensions: 8 x 5.3 x 0.6 inches

About the Author:
Fr. Gabriele Amorth

Gabriele Amorth was an Italian Roman Catholic priest and an exorcist of the Diocese of Rome who claimed to have performed tens of thousands of exorcisms. Amorth authored two books specifically on exorcism. The two books An Exorcist Tells His Story and An Exorcist: More Stories are not official Roman Catholic documents, rather personal accounts of his office as Exorcist. The books use witness accounts and personal experience as evidence. The two books include references to official Roman Catholic teachings on demonology, however the main emphasis is on Amorth's experience as an exorcist. Both include references to the diagnosis and treatment of spiritual problems. The books briefly cover the topics of demonic contraction and curses.

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A step down from the first

The book starts off with Father Amorth once again discussing the prominent theme of his previous book which is, the rising need of exorcisms due to "Western consumerism." He holds that the inadequate supply of exorcists is largely due to theological errors which are taught in seminaries.

There is plenty of redundant material, such as content relating to the angels, Satan’s fall and role as prince of all creation, the six categories of Satan’s extraordinary activity (as opposed to ordinary, or temptation), the four principle causes of possession, and once again the methodology for priests performing exorcisms.

The most interesting and unique part of the book is actually its discussion on the “nefarious influence of certain music.” Amorth points out that music of evil influence abides by 4 principles: beat, volume intensity, ritual consecration of every record during a black mass. Here is his elaboration of the first principle:

“Beat. The first important item is the rhythm, called beat, which mimics the sexual act. Abruptly, the listeners are caught up in a frenzy designed to produce a sort of hysteria. It is the result of the sexual instinct, which is aroused through the use of beat.”

He goes on to deconstruct the psychological impact of the other nefarious principles in eye-opening fashion. His explanation is excellent at peeling back a layer of self-deception that so many people have regarding popular music.

This book was made because of the tremendous reaction and attention that was given to the first book. But it turns out that there just wasn’t much else to say about exorcisms/demons, and so they loaded the book with detailed accounts of possessions that each illustrate a certain purpose. These accounts are the most engaging parts of the book, while the rest is either redundant methodology for would-be exorcists, or Catholic teaching on demonology that’s old news for orthodox Catholics. All in all, this is a book you can pass on.